History of St. Charles Township

This township was organized Feb. 9, 1853. The territory composing this town ship at the present time is described on the map as township 10 north, range 3 east, and is bounded on the north by the townships of Swan Creek and James, on the east by Albee, on the south by Chesaning, and on the west by Brant township. The Jackson , Lansing & Saginaw railroad enters the township through section 5, passing nearly due south in a straight line out of the township through section 33. Within the township there are two railroad stations, one at the village of St. Charles , and the other at Pine Grove station, on section 28.

The lands of the township are drained by the Shiawassee river, which passes from south to north through its center, while the Bad river and its branches course through its northwestern corner. The soil of the township is fertile, and consists of various kinds, such as sandy clay, loam, gravel, etc. Originally its lands were covered by a dense growth of forest of various kinds of hard-wood and pine.

Among the first permanent settlers in the township were Hiram Davis, C. B. Kimberly, Alpheus Oliver, from Ohio ; Frank Oliver, Benjamin Colvin, from New York ; Francis Harris and O. Doty came in 1852. At this time the only means of conveyance for families or goods was by canoe and rafts, it being almost impossible to pass through the dense forests with a team.

The following year many other settlers came into the township, and soon there were enough inhabitants to perfect its organization. Among other early settlers may be mentioned J. T. Symes and Jared Freeman.

The population of the township is 1,539. The township outside of St. Charles village has three school-houses, being districts Nos. 3 , 5 and 7; average attendance of scholars in the three combined is 186. Each district averages six months school per year.